NIH Grants $1.6M to Project Exploring Possible Link Between Environmental Pollutants and Endometriosis

NIH Grants $1.6M to Project Exploring Possible Link Between Environmental Pollutants and Endometriosis
5
(1)

A research project focused on investigating the possible relationship between environmental pollutants and endometriosis has been given a $1.6-million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The project will be led by Anna Pollack, PhD, an associate professor at the George Mason University College of Health and Human Services, together with co-investigators Germaine Buck Louis, PhD, and Jenna Krall, PhD.

The study will look for possible links between the reproductive disease and endocrine-disrupting chemicals commonly found in human diets and household products. Such chemicals may have negative developmental, reproductive, and neurological effects.

The investigation is unique in that it will gauge concentrations of chemicals both inside and outside of the uterus (womb). The main goals of the study are to assess whether endocrine disruptors found inside the uterus could be linked to endometriosis, and whether those found in tissues outside the uterus could be associated with disease severity.

The project will use data and tissue specimens gathered from the “Endometriosis: Natural History, Diagnosis, and Outcomes” (ENDO) study. The study, conducted at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, enrolled 495 women, ages 18–44, with or without endometriosis, who had laparoscopic surgery (a diagnostic procedure used to examine organs within the abdomen).

In the current investigation, the scientists will study tissues obtained during these surgeries to assess the concentrations of endocrine disruptors inside the uterus of women with endometriosis and healthy women.

“NIH support for this research will shed insight about endocrine disruptors’ roles in the development of gynecologic diseases such as endometriosis,” Louis, dean of the College of Health and Human Services and principal investigator of the ENDO study, said in a press release.

“As an emerging leader in public health research, George Mason University is a natural place for this research to take place,” Louis added.

The investigation will focus on polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), two classes of endocrine-disrupting chemicals that remain in the human body for a long time following initial exposure. PFASs are commonly found in water systems and in household items, such as stain-resistant fabrics and nonstick frying pans, while POPs have not been produced in the U.S. for several years.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
Total Posts: 17
Joana holds a BSc in Biology, a MSc in Evolutionary and Developmental Biology and a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal. Her work has been focused on the impact of non-canonical Wnt signaling in the collective behavior of endothelial cells — cells that made up the lining of blood vessels — found in the umbilical cord of newborns.
×
Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
Latest Posts
  • EndoFound
  • endometriosis and pain

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 5 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

As you found this post useful...

Follow us on social media!

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?